10 Q w/ Nikki Glaspie of The Nth Power
May13

10 Q w/ Nikki Glaspie of The Nth Power

cheap jordans cheap air jordans michael kors cheap jordans michael kors outlet online Interview by Kara Wilbeck Over here at the Portland Metronome, we are super excited for the Nth Power’s return to Portland at Mississippi Studios tonight, Friday, May 13! This weekend, we had the chance to chat with the band’s leader and drummer,  Nikki Glaspie. Check out what she had to say! PM: Being a supergroup of powerhouse musicians, it must be hard to coordinate schedules to tour or record! Do you often have to schedule around shows of other bands you play with, or is the Nth Power everyone’s top priority? NG: The Nth Power is everyone’s top priority, but even still, it is hard to find time to write and record because we are working so much. PM: Your bio mentions that the band was formed from a 3 a.m. jam at New Orleans Jazz Fest. Can you tell the story behind how this jam came about? What were you all doing there, and who else had you been playing with? What was the moment when you realized you had something special and wanted to continue playing together? How long did it take you all to get organized and meet up again as a band? NG: Nick [Cassarino] and I are members of the Jennifer Hartswick band. The keyboard player Rob Marsher and the bass player Dezron Douglas couldn’t make it to jazz fest that year. Jen called me and asked me if I knew the bass player that could do the gig. Of course I did! I called Nate Edgar and said, “Do you want to come down here and play this gig?” He said yes. Then Jen asked me about Nigel [Hall]. She said, “Can he play the gig?” I said, “Yes, he can play the gig.” We did not have a chance to rehearse so at sound check we did a little jamming, and we all looked at each other and were like, this is a band. We started writing and recording immediately. And here we are. PM: Tell me one of your wackiest/wildest/funniest stories from touring! NG: On our tour last fall we were driving from North Carolina to Richmond, Va. Nick was driving and noticed the battery gauge falling quickly and said we were losing power fast. At the next exit there was an AutoZone. Courtney [Smith] went inside and borrowed a computer to find out that we needed a new alternator. He replaced the alternator right there in the parking lot. And we made it to the gig on time. That’s when we found out we had a resident mechanic....

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10 Questions for Karl Denson
Nov17

10 Questions for Karl Denson

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NWSS Preview: 10Q with the Shook Twins
Jul16

NWSS Preview: 10Q with the Shook Twins

Interview by Kara Wilbeck Photo courtesy of the Shook Twins The Shook Twins are two of our favorite local treasures here in the Pacific Northwest! As they gain popularity, we Portlanders consider ourselves lucky to have the identical songbirds Laurie and Katelyn right in our backyards. Their band’s fun and magical sets have been a Northwest String Summit mainstay for years, and we’re looking forward to yet another festival with them! In anticipation of this weekend’s festival, we talked with Katelyn Shook about the Shook Twins’ music, their new album, and what we can expect from them at NWSS! 1. Portland Metronome: Your music has a sound that we just haven’t heard before. Growing up and making music together, how did this sound develop in its incubation period? Katelyn Shook: Well, it’s been a long process of finding out sound over the years. When we first started playing music we were covering songs of all genres for no particular reason, mostly if a song was simple enough for us to play and interesting enough for us to “Shookify.” And then out of the chords and harmonies of the cover songs, we crafted our own cheesy originals, which were not good in our opinion now! Over time, we got more drawn to the ambient and eerie sounds that we incorporate in our originals nowadays… and of course adding other extremely talented musicians like Niko [Daoussis] and Kyle [Volkman] helped us compose way more intricate instrumental parts!   2. PM: Your voices sound so similar, but you both have your unique musical personalities. As twins, how have you found ways to explore and broaden your individual styles and talents? KS: Well, Laurie has really expanded and focused on her looping and beat-boxing and percussion over the years, and she has also strengthened her harmony skills being in our side project, Morning Ritual. I have been able to focus on my rhythm guitar and vocal skills through both bands as well.   3. PM:  You are known for playing both daytime and late night sets at festivals – do you play differently depending on the setting? KS: Yes, our day sets are pretty normal… our night sets can be quite interesting depending on the festival! We always try to bring out the grooves for the late-night sets or at least get as dancy and weird as a folk band can be! We’ve been known too bust out some classic hip hop covers like “Gangster’s Paradise” and “No Diggity” and we also feature Niko and his solo project, Cyber Camel. He has some amazingly fun and surprising hip hop-esque originals that we do specially for those late-night festy sets. It’s so...

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Speaking with the Space Dog: An Interview with Bluetech
Jan30

Speaking with the Space Dog: An Interview with Bluetech

Interview by Jack Yaguda Images courtesy of Bluetech Ambient electronic music producer Evan Bartholomew, better known by his DJ moniker Bluetech, will return in February to the Pacific Northwest to promote his new EP release, The Spacehop Chronicles, Vol. 1. Bluetech’s unique sound falls into the rare space of shared appeal for hardcore EDM fans as well as those who are more inclined toward other genres. The Portland Metronome’s Jack Yaguda (known to Portlandians as DJ Guda) spoke with Bartholomew about his latest work, upcoming tour, and his philosophy of social responsibility and connectedness. _________________________________________________________________ Portland Metronome: Could you tell me a little bit about this new EP that’s coming out soon? Evan Bartholomew: The Spacehop Chronicles, Vol. 1. I actually kind of dreamed up the idea on the last tour. I was thinking about getting back to my background in classical music and making really composed and melodic music, and thinking about music more from a melodic story rather than making a track that works on a dance floor. I really wanted to pair that kind of composition aesthetic with proper analog sense and some good down-low beat structures that I had popping around my head. When I got home from this last tour I went into the studio and started making it happen. PM: Did you experiment with any new compositional techniques, new sound sources, or anything like that on this album?  “[I’m] not focusing so much on the tracks, but focusing on making sounds that have an emotional resonance. For me, it’s like a sketchbook kind of concept instead of a painting.” EB: Not really. It was kind of a returning- simplifying my focus, not focusing so much on the tracks, but focusing on making sounds that have an emotional resonance. For me, it’s like a sketchbook kind of concept instead of a painting.  I just allow myself to move and to work and to let ideas move instead of being innerly pensive and focusing on microdetails. Somehow the composition just came out better and much more musical than anything I’ve done in a little while. PM: So [The Spacehop Chronicles] is going to be in four volumes, right? EB: At least four volumes. PM: What was the inspiration for doing it in multiple volumes this time? EB: The inspiration is the fact that I read a lot of graphic novels, and I love this concept of a serialized release, where you get the first piece and you have to wait for the next one. I actually have some plans for the Spacehop Chronicles expanding into a visual aesthetic, and I’m collaborating with a writer as well to tell the story of my character, the Space Dog....

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The Fruits of Labor: An Interview with Fruition’s Jay Cobb Anderson
Jan05

The Fruits of Labor: An Interview with Fruition’s Jay Cobb Anderson

Interview by Rich Messmer Photo Courtesy of Fruition Last summer, local folk-rockers Fruition pulled the veil off of their highly anticipated studio release titled, “Just One of Them Nights.” The new album—their fourth release and most ambitious to date—comes at a very exciting time for the group. They seem more confident than ever with their evolving sound, and around every turn the group finds themselves playing bigger stages in bigger cities from coast to coast. I was lucky enough to catch up with Jay Cobb Anderson, a vocalist, lead guitarist, and songwriter for the group on a recent afternoon. We had a fun conversation chatting it up about the new album, the evolution of Fruition’s sound, the group’s love for the Rose City, as well as future plans for the group, among other things. Here is some of what we got to talk about:   Portland Metronome: You recently released your newest album, “Just One of them Nights.” There has been a lot of excitement and anticipation surrounding this album. How are you guys feeling about it? Jay Cobb Anderson: Oh man, I feel so good about the record. You know, we’ve kind struggled for a while trying to get an accurate sound of what we sound like live now. The selection of songs and everything I’m really happy with. We worked really hard on it and it turned out really fantastic. PM: How was this experience different from your previous efforts in the studio? JCA: A lot of our previous stuff had been very “DIY,” and to get inside a full on professional studio was great. We got to do a lot more experimenting with all of our instruments and experimented with a lot more arranging than we had in the past. Being able to work with a great engineer who’s recorded a million different people was very helpful. We learned a lot, you know, with different studio tricks. I had a million different ideas in my head that I was able to try out. A lot of them worked out great but some of them didn’t. But just getting to try out so many things was really a learning experience. PM: I found it pretty interesting that you guys funded the album through a very successful Kickstarter campaign. How did it feel going into the studio with that type of financial backing? JCA: It was amazing. Nowadays the music industry is so topsy-turvy and being an artist it’s hard to keep up with it all. So when we found out about Kickstarter and some of our friends were doing it and being successful, we thought, what a great idea....

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An Intimate Evening with Krista Herring, Portland’s Acoustic Queen
Jun14

An Intimate Evening with Krista Herring, Portland’s Acoustic Queen

Review by Kenneth Harris Photo by CB Images, Courtesy of Krista Herring We’re at the Laurelthirst Public House for an evening of acoustic grace with the talented Krista Herring. Friends and local musicians mill about in anticipation for the “Guitar Butterfly” to land on stage. Krista starts out her set with a pensive song about the nature of love called “Love Is A Mirror.” A delightful beginning to the set, her personable charm is already taking root. She instantly engages the crowd with a story of travel and friends through an introduction to her next song: “Simple Life, which was written while on the road. She began writing it in one part of the country and completed it in another. The song was finished at the home of a friend, who also happened to be at the show that evening. The genuine feeling in this song’s prelude seemed to cast a level of comfort akin to being in a living room with friends. This is part of the magnetism and enchantment of Krista’s performances. The glow in the room was warm and the song was met with open arms (and ears!) from the crowd. Krista Herring hails from California. Self-taught on guitar from a very young age, this lady came into contact with her own desires to travel and play music abroad. Gathering much inspiration from this and exploring several musical influences such as James Taylor, Joni Mitchell, and Crosby Stills and Nash, this singer songwriter has been shaped into the passion-wielding weaver of stories and songs she is today. All of this is reflected very well by Krista. Krista Herring has been part of Portland’s music scene and community for approximately ten years. We’ve come to know her as a gypsy songstress. She loves to travel, explore new areas and she even “The Songwriter’s Pilgrimage” to Nashville and lived there for several months. In fact, Krista brought back some new songs she wrote conveying some of her experiences from her time there. Her presence is always captivating. I’ve seen Krista in festival, cafe and night club settings, and it never ceases to amaze me how she commands attention. Krista somehow magically enchants a crowd. Her smile, smooth guitar and honey-laced vocals always afford an enchanting glow. By her third song, she is joined by guitarist Chris Casarez. This is a huge surprise, as I’m used to seeing Krista solo. This smooth guitar player accompanies her very well. They play together on stage with a confident familiarity. I was surprised to hear later from Krista that they had never performed together live. Later, Krista is joined by Chuck Kwaske...

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